Woods in transition…Part 1

The woods are in the beginning of transition. Went for a Sunday drive and ended up out at Oxley Nature Center, as I have often, but today there was some drizzle with a high chance of it turning to rain, and it did.

 

The woods were so still during the rain, it made me stop and just be. If it wasn’t for the sounds of the rain in the woods you would almost think the video was a photo. Just a moment in time in the woods.

 

I had already decided to head home because of the rain. I packed up my camera and headed towards to the parking lot when I stopped to watch the field and the rain for a second. I decided to get my phone out to grab a snapshot of the field and maybe a video, not wanting to get my camera out of it’s bag. That is when this little guy walked across the trail, I snapped a photo of him then thought I should video him, so this is what I got. After I continued on my way wishing I hadn’t put my main camera up, the moment reminded me of something Jim Richardson said about “not being done until your are done.” In other words, don’t put your gear away until your completely “DONE!

Advertisements

Oklahoma Wind Energy

Chisholm View Wind Project, Northeast of Enid, OK ©Billy Sauerland

In 2010 Oklahoma adopted a goal of generating 15% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2015. Wind power accounted for 18.4% of the electricity generated in Oklahoma during 2015. At the end of 2015, Oklahoma’s installed wind generation capacity was 5184 MW.

Potential

Being centrally located, the western half of Oklahoma is in America’s wind corridor, which stretches from Canada into North Dakota and Montana, south into west Texas, where the vast majority of the country’s best on-shore wind resources are located.  Oklahoma has the potential to install 517,000 MW of wind turbines, capable of generating 1,521,652 GWh each year. This is over one third of all the electricity generated in the United States in 2011.

The Economics

Oklahoma’s wind resources are the eighth best in the United States. The total number of direct and indirect jobs in the state from wind power development is estimated to be between 1,000 and 2,000.

Oklahoma ended the half-cent tax credit for wind by July 2017. All zero-emission rebates were $60 million in the 2014 tax year.

©Billy Sauerland

Growth

Some of the wind farms in Oklahoma include:

The $3.5 billion, 800 mile, Plains & Eastern Clean Line transmission line was approved in 2012, which will when completed in 2017 have the capacity to deliver 7,000 MW of wind power. As of April, 2017, Clean Line Energy Partners did not have any binding contracts to provide electricity to an electric utility. The only tentative, nonbinding, agreement Clean Line was able to obtain was for 50 MW of capacity.

In 2010 Oklahoma adopted a goal of generating 15% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2015.

Wind power accounted for 18.4% of the electricity generated in Oklahoma during 2015. At the end of 2015, Oklahoma’s installed wind generation capacity was 5184 MW.

(All information for post was obtained from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the US Department of Energy. All of this information and more available for view to the public at their sites.)

Under good leadership at state and local levels and combined with proper incentives Oklahoma could lead the country in wind energy. This is just another reason to get our and vote. Here are links to help you find where your county election boards are and where you can register and where your polling places are Oklahoma State Election Board.

 

Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge – Oklahoma

West of Tulsa almost 3 hours is the Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge. Designated as the “largest such saline flat in the central lowlands of North America,” the 11,200- acre salt flat of Salt Plains National Wildlife Refuge is essential to wildlife.

However on this visit I ended up staying the wetland area of the refuge. The refuge consists of approximately 26,232 acres of classified wetlands. Wetlands include things such as lakes, ponds, rivers, creeks, and low level areas that are prone to flooding and have high soil moisture. Wetlands can contain shrubs, trees, grasses and/or wetland specific plants. Wetlands provide homes for many reptiles and amphibians. Wetlands also aide in the decomposition of organic matter and naturally filter water as it passes through.

Here are a few of the photos I was able to capture. I am planning to head back, most likely in the fall.